About half of the country’s livestock die before they are economically viable, costing the sector billions of shillings, a new report shows.

The Political Economy Analysis of the Livestock Sector in Kenya, a report compiled by the Kenya Markets Trust, shows the losses are caused by poor disease control coupled with the gross underfunding of the sector and inadequate staff with requisite technical knowledge.

The report notes the sector has been neglected despite the country being the third largest producer of livestock in Africa, after Ethiopia and Botswana.

Kenya’s livestock sector is currently worth over Sh250 billion, with approximately 17.3 million cows, 2.9 million camels, 1.8 million donkeys, 28 million goats, 32 million indigenous chickens, 17 million sheep, 330,000 pigs and 1.8 million beehives.

Livestock PS Harry Kimutai, during an event to unveil the report this week in Nairobi, said that the ministry acknowledges that livestock farmers are facing challenges ranging from low productivity, lack of a reliable market for their products as well as the high cost of production.

“We are focusing on exploring means of reducing the cost of production. These include improving the quality of animal feeds, animal genetic improvement, and livestock disease control to boost access to the international markets,” he said in a statement read on his behalf by the chairman of the Kenya Veterinary Board, Dr Christopher Wanga.

Head of programmes at KMT, Dr Rip Kirby, disclosed that weak coordination between the county and national governments has contributed to the loss of potential investors.

Further, the challenge of sustainable livestock production has hit harder counties in the arid and semi-arid areas.

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“If the sector does not address the confusion and ignorance within the supply chain, then Kenya will lose more investors and business partners,” said Dr Kirby. Mandera West MP Adan Haji said the livestock sector had been side-lined.

“Livestock, particularly, those kept by pastoralists, have been given a blackout as far as policy and development are concerned,” he said.

Trans Nzoia Agriculture executive Mary Nzomo noted that the livestock sector has suffered historical injustice where some drought-prone counties have been neglected.

“The focus has been on the high potential areas and very little on the frontier counties,” she adds.

According to the 2019 Economic Survey, the livestock sector contributes to 12 per cent of Gross Domestic Product (GDP) and 40 per cent to the agricultural GDP. The sector has also employed about 10 million Kenyans throughout its supply chain.

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https://i0.wp.com/farmerstrend.co.ke/wp-content/uploads/2019/08/slider-1-1920x967.jpg?fit=1024%2C516&ssl=1https://i0.wp.com/farmerstrend.co.ke/wp-content/uploads/2019/08/slider-1-1920x967.jpg?resize=150%2C150&ssl=1#FarmersTrend#TrendingLivestock FarmingAbout half of the country’s livestock die before they are economically viable, costing the sector billions of shillings, a new report shows. The Political Economy Analysis of the Livestock Sector in Kenya, a report compiled by the Kenya Markets Trust, shows the losses are caused by poor disease control coupled...New generation culture in agriculture