Goats
Lawrence Ndeke

Meet Lawrence Ndeke. The 57 years old is keeping goats in his half-acre farm in Gitwaka, 2km from Chuka town, a journey he started in 1999 with just one goat and has become a fast-growing multi-million dairy goat farm.  The father of six shares his success story.

“I started with just a Toggenburg doe, which was given to me and other farmers by Farm Africa a non-governmental organisation (NGO) which looks at poverty alleviation. We were being given the animals so that we don’t starve, he begins.

He says the project involved villagers who were put in groups and were given four Does and two bucks. They were also trained on how to rear goats. Members were to share goat kids until each one of them received his.

Since then his farm has grown to over a million shillings investment.  “From  one goat my in terms of the number of goats I have .The farm currently has 35 Toggenburg animals, from over 100, without forgetting that I also sold some  during the last Christmas festive and earned about Sh1.5 million.

He says “Goats have pushed him to greater heights from poverty . He has educated his children all the way to the university and purchased several pieces of land where I grow fodder.

His goats’ sheds has pens measuring 4 by 5 metres each holding four animals. The pens are divided into two (a resting place and a feeding section). He says a part from shelter and protection, agood pen should also shield the animals from opportunistic diseases.

He says every shed should be raised at least a metre high , well ventilated, have enough light, should be clean and dry since dampness attract pests and diseases and cause the release of ammonia gas which affects the animals.

The Shed also has a maternity wing where  each pen holds goats depending on their gestation. Bucks, does and kids are also kept separately and is cleaned twice a week. “I used their wastes as manure for farming, which include growing fodder,” Ndeke

READ ALSO:   Beginner’s guide to building a modern, predator-proof chicken house

At the goats’ sheds, the pens measuring 4 by 5 metres each hold four animals and are divided into two; one side consisting of a resting place and the other a feeding section.

“A good pen should not only offer shelter and protection for the animals, but also shield them from opportunistic diseases.”

The shed should be raised a metre above the ground, be properly ventilated, lit, be neat, clean and dry as a dampness w

ill attract pests and diseases and cause the release of ammonia gas which affects the animals.

At the maternity wing, each pen holds goats depending on their gestation. Bucks, does and kids are also kept separately. The shed is cleaned twice a week and he uses manure for farming, including for growing fodder.

Once a kid is borne, Ndeke feeds it on milk and it is allowed to suck directly from its mother for two weeks. In the third week, he introduces solid foods that include sweet potato vines and banana leaves to help in rumen development while providing clean sufficient water.

Ndeke  also feeds his goats on banana and orange peelings and garlic skins.  For protein he offers  them fish meal, cotton cake and soybean.

“My goats feed between 11pm and 3am. One should offer adequate feeds to the animals at night for proper growth and reproduction.”

At the goats’ sheds, the pens measuring 4 by 5 metres each hold four animals and are divided into two; one side consisting of a resting place and the other a feeding section.

“A good pen should not only offer shelter and protection for the animals, but also shield them from opportunistic diseases.”

The shed should be raised a metre above the ground, be properly ventilated, lit, be neat, clean and dry as a dampness will attract pests and diseases and cause the release of ammonia gas which affects the animals.

READ ALSO:   Things to look for before purchasing a dairy cow in Kenya

At the maternity wing, each pen holds goats depending on their gestation. Bucks, does and kids are also kept separately. The shed is cleaned twice a week and he uses manure for farming, including for growing fodder.

Once a kid is borne, Ndeke feeds it on milk and it is allowed to suck directly from its mother for two weeks. In the third week, he introduces solid foods that include sweet potato vines and banana leaves to help in rumen development while providing clean sufficient water. He also feeds his goats on banana and orange peelings and garlic skins.

Ndeke feeds the new  borne kids on milk. He allows them to suck directly from their mother for two weeks and while in the third week, introduces solid foods. the solid foods include sweet potato vines and banana leaves. This help in rumen development while providing clean sufficient water.

Besides the vines and bananas, Ndeke grows desmodium, calliandra, leucaena, napier grass, mulberry, maize, cowpeas and soybean for fodder. He also feeds his goats on banana and orange peelings and garlic skins.

Abiel Njagi, is a livestock extension officer in Chuka. She says the consumption of the placenta may inhibit milk production. The placenta, which is an animal protein, isn’t meant for ruminants and consists of high levels of estrogen and progesterone hormones which inhibit lactation.

He notes that feeding is key when it comes to kidding more than one offspring, though genetic factors also play a key role, and can be interfered with by management.

“In a good season, like between July to August and December last year, I sell goats worth at least Sh1 million, with a pure Toggenburg goat going for Sh25,000 and a three-quarter breed going for Sh15,000. I also milks the animals though he prefers feeding the milk to the kids first and sells the rest at Sh90 a litre to Muthiru Dairy in Tharaka Nithi County.

READ ALSO:   I make millions from goat farming in Chuka - success story of Lawrence Ndeke

***

Leave us your feedback below

Hits: 18

If you like the article, share here with others, join our whatsup and telegram too
MalachiGoat FarmingLivestock FarmingFarm Africa  Meet Lawrence Ndeke. The 57 years old is keeping goats in his half-acre farm in Gitwaka, 2km from Chuka town, a journey he started in 1999 with just one goat and has become a fast-growing multi-million dairy goat farm.  The father of six shares his success story. 'I started with...New generation culture in agriculture